Cashflows with Cash Matthews

113. Unlocking the American Dream with Joshua Sabharwall's 'F6' Philosophy

May 09, 2024 Cash Matthews, Kenneth Baucum, Joshua Sabharwall Season 2 Episode 113
113. Unlocking the American Dream with Joshua Sabharwall's 'F6' Philosophy
Cashflows with Cash Matthews
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Cashflows with Cash Matthews
113. Unlocking the American Dream with Joshua Sabharwall's 'F6' Philosophy
May 09, 2024 Season 2 Episode 113
Cash Matthews, Kenneth Baucum, Joshua Sabharwall

Have something to ask or share? Send us a text!

Ever felt like perfectionism is holding you back from your entrepreneurial dreams? Joshua Sabharwall, our inspiring guest, empowers you to cast aside doubts and take action with the 'fire, aim, ready' philosophy. His journey from pharmacy to the pulsing heart of business ventures is a powerful reminder that every path, regardless of its twists, is valid and brimming with potential. As we traverse the adventure from city life to rural serenity, Joshua's insights into the entrepreneurial spirit are a vibrant tapestry woven from faith, family, fitness, finances, and freedom. This conversation is a treasure trove for anyone itching to start, grow, and revel in the magic of their aspirations.

Listen and be energized by the story of Joshua's American Dream Project, or 'F6,' where a passion for helping others lights the way to success. This episode is not just an auditory journey but a clarion call to anyone feeling the tug of the American Dream. We explore how the echoes of garage sales ring through Joshua's business acumen, and how the pursuit of fulfillment often outshines the gleam of financial gain. The 'F6' philosophy stands as a beacon for rekindling the American Dream through a lifestyle company that celebrates the foundational six Fs—faith, family, fitness, finance, firearms, and freedom.

As we wrap up, our hearts are full of gratitude for the wisdom Joshua has imparted through PatriotDreamProject.com. Our final reflections turn to the pursuit of excellence, inspired by Plato's wisdom and the importance of forgiveness and personal growth. This episode is a call to arms for those ready to take that next step, those who are eager to weave the six Fs into their life's fabric. So, join us on this journey of discovery and dare to take that leap towards a life of excellence and fulfillment.

Produced by Kenneth Baucum
Boost your business with our expert photo, video, and audio production services.

MFP - My Financial Plan
Manage all assets securely with My Financial Plan's tools and daily updates.

Branded items by CM Customs
Explore CM Customs for unique, affordable gifts and branding solutions.

Tulsa Business Owners Networking Group
Join Tulsa B.O.N.G. for vibrant local business networking online and in-person meetups.

Recorded at Elevate Coworking
Elevate Coworking: Where local business owners connect, collaborate, and grow.

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

Get connected with this incredible group of Tulsa-area business owners and entrepreneurs by joining us for free at the Tulsa B.O.N.G. at https://www.facebook.com/groups/tulsabong or TulsaBONG.com. We can't wait to meet you!

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Have something to ask or share? Send us a text!

Ever felt like perfectionism is holding you back from your entrepreneurial dreams? Joshua Sabharwall, our inspiring guest, empowers you to cast aside doubts and take action with the 'fire, aim, ready' philosophy. His journey from pharmacy to the pulsing heart of business ventures is a powerful reminder that every path, regardless of its twists, is valid and brimming with potential. As we traverse the adventure from city life to rural serenity, Joshua's insights into the entrepreneurial spirit are a vibrant tapestry woven from faith, family, fitness, finances, and freedom. This conversation is a treasure trove for anyone itching to start, grow, and revel in the magic of their aspirations.

Listen and be energized by the story of Joshua's American Dream Project, or 'F6,' where a passion for helping others lights the way to success. This episode is not just an auditory journey but a clarion call to anyone feeling the tug of the American Dream. We explore how the echoes of garage sales ring through Joshua's business acumen, and how the pursuit of fulfillment often outshines the gleam of financial gain. The 'F6' philosophy stands as a beacon for rekindling the American Dream through a lifestyle company that celebrates the foundational six Fs—faith, family, fitness, finance, firearms, and freedom.

As we wrap up, our hearts are full of gratitude for the wisdom Joshua has imparted through PatriotDreamProject.com. Our final reflections turn to the pursuit of excellence, inspired by Plato's wisdom and the importance of forgiveness and personal growth. This episode is a call to arms for those ready to take that next step, those who are eager to weave the six Fs into their life's fabric. So, join us on this journey of discovery and dare to take that leap towards a life of excellence and fulfillment.

Produced by Kenneth Baucum
Boost your business with our expert photo, video, and audio production services.

MFP - My Financial Plan
Manage all assets securely with My Financial Plan's tools and daily updates.

Branded items by CM Customs
Explore CM Customs for unique, affordable gifts and branding solutions.

Tulsa Business Owners Networking Group
Join Tulsa B.O.N.G. for vibrant local business networking online and in-person meetups.

Recorded at Elevate Coworking
Elevate Coworking: Where local business owners connect, collaborate, and grow.

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

Get connected with this incredible group of Tulsa-area business owners and entrepreneurs by joining us for free at the Tulsa B.O.N.G. at https://www.facebook.com/groups/tulsabong or TulsaBONG.com. We can't wait to meet you!

Speaker 1:

Hello, entrepreneurs, dreamers, business owners and happy people with high hopes. Welcome to Cash Flows with your host, cash Matthews.

Speaker 2:

Good morning, we're glad you're here today. I'm Cash Matthews, your host. Our show today is called Cash Flows and we have a great guest for you today and we'll get to him in just a minute, but hoping everybody out there in the world is doing wonderfully. You know, our show is about entrepreneurship and faith and family and all of those things that we all strive for to have that, that magical life. And I think life is magical, kenneth, even when we face troubles and trials, I think it's still very beautiful. And then with that, let me just say hi to my cohort here, mr Kenneth Bockham. Kenneth, what's been going on with you?

Speaker 3:

Oh, man, just dealing with those. We talked a little bit about the Oklahoma winds, I think last time we were here. Allergies coming in and out, so I'm a little bit hoarse today. I'm a small horse.

Speaker 2:

Well, doesn't the song go like the waving wheat sure smells sweet, until your eyes swell up, I.

Speaker 3:

Like the waving wheat. Sure smells sweet until your eyes swell up. I think so.

Speaker 2:

Yes, I think they left that verse out in the song Oklahoma, but anyway, well, very cool. I hope you're on the mend and life is good. But you know, this show is about taking action and it's about doing things that benefit your life and moving forward. We have a philosophy that is fire, aim ready, and I have found in my life that too many people are just kind of like ready, aim, aim, aim and they never really pull the trigger on the things that they really want. It's scary, and the magic in your life occurs when you begin to do those things you don't really want to do. That's where the magic lies, is behind your procrastination or behind your lack of knowledge or attention. So here at Cash Flows, we want to encourage you to take action not perfect action, just, I don't know. Pretty boring Action can be kind of boring. I think life's a little bit better just doing a whole lot of small things. Yeah, imperfect action, Imperfect action Well, I am very capable.

Speaker 3:

Do something yeah.

Speaker 2:

Or yeah, don't just my dad had some phrase about that Don't just I don't know what it was Don't just stand there, do something. Don't just do something, stand there.

Speaker 1:

Oh, right, there it is. That might be the better one.

Speaker 2:

So you ready to get on with episode number. What number is this?

Speaker 3:

112, 113? This 1.12?, 1.13? I forget, we're well over 100.

Speaker 2:

We're somewhere there, anyway, so welcome to Cash Flows. Our guest today is Joshua. I want to make sure I say it right Saberwall, close. Say it again Saberwall, saberwall. Okay, I want to make sure we do that correctly.

Speaker 4:

The way that you said. It is probably the most common pronunciation of it.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so we've already butchered the guest's name, so I would think we're off to a pretty normal start. Anyway, we're here with Joshua Saberwal and you can find him on the web at patriotdreamprojectcom. Today we're going to talk about faith and family and fitness and finances and firearms and freedom. We're going to go through some things and we're very glad to have you here today, josh.

Speaker 4:

I'm excited to be here. Thank you for the opportunity.

Speaker 2:

Well, so we want to just jump in and find out a little bit about you. So we met you through the Tulsa Business Owners Networking Group. Is that our connection?

Speaker 4:

Yes, I unfortunately haven't been able to get to an event yet. I've been wanting to. I think what I struggle with most was I didn't feel qualified to come to anything, and so now it is my goal to at least come to one thing a month, and good for you. But it's an awesome group. Uh, I've learned so many things just from people's posts and seeing what everybody does, and it's just a really neat tool to have.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's been pretty cool and we get to meet people like you, but let me assure you you are qualified, you know. Basically, if you can drink coffee with any, you know, any consistency, you're going to fit right into the group. I think I can do that Well. So let's let's hear a little bit, then, about your story and how did you arrive here, and if you want to go back a little ways and tell us, because I think our listeners and viewers like to connect with people on a real basis. Like you just said a minute ago, imperfect action and I think that is one of the best pieces of advice is to just take action, imperfect or not. So give us your story, you know. Bring us up to where you are now.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so I was. I was originally born in Kansas, around the Kansas city area. I grew up there for about the first 14 years of life Um, I'm 24 now. Last week was actually my birthday Um, but we grew up there, I, so I don't have this big crazy story, and that's kind of the point I wanted to make with. This is nothing. I grew up in a normal family, normal home. I had my fair share of adversity, but it's nothing crazy. It's not like I went down in this deep dark hole and had to figure out how to dig myself out of it dark hole and had to figure out how to dig myself out of it. But that's the thing, though, with people's stories is that you get so caught up on wanting to have this story they don't take the action. They don't actually fire, like you said, fire, aim, ready, they wait, they aim, they aim, they aim, and that's the big thing. But I grew up in Kansas. Um, believe it or not, I wasn't in the farm world. I was a city boy because I grew up in Kansas. Believe it or not, I wasn't in the farm world. I was a city boy because I grew up in Kansas City.

Speaker 4:

We moved down to Oklahoma because my parents were originally from Oklahoma and it was my grandmother. She was diagnosed with cancer and so we moved down here and it's probably the best thing that ever happened was moving back here. Wow, because I originally went to pharmacy school and I was going to be a pharmacist, was dead set on being a pharmacist and having my own pharmacy, and then wonderful events of 2020 happened, right, and there were just some things going on, things that were being told that I had to do that I really didn't feel comfortable with and so, as hard as it was, I had only about two years left to complete my degree and I just I wasn't comfortable with it, and so I decided to make a life change, and so that life change went to business. I was going to get a business degree, all that business. I was going to get a business degree, all that and I just had a realization while I was in some classes that it wasn't really for me, because there were things that these professors were teaching us that they had never actually practiced before, and it was just so mind-blowing to me because they were talking about when we would do certain equations or stuff they would say to leave out taxes or leave out inflation and all this other stuff, and it just didn't make any sense to me. Got it, and so it was really just that drive. That was like you know what? I want to go out, do my own thing and have an impact on the world, and so that's kind of what got me here today.

Speaker 4:

I fed my fair share of entrepreneur failures. Good, okay, now we're cooking. Yeah, I did everything I felt for all the I guess you'd call it get rich quick schemes. Oh right, the day trading, the. I tried an SMMA, so much stuff. Airbnb was the one that I had a little bit of success with no-transcript.

Speaker 4:

I feel like a lot of people miss. Uh, they focus too much on the money part first and it's easy to do. But what they don't realize is you focus on helping people, then the money will take care of everything sort of follows.

Speaker 2:

So what was your first? Did you ever have an endeavor when you were younger? Kool-aid, stand mowing yards. Did you have an entrepreneurial spirit? Earlier.

Speaker 4:

Not necessarily, I mean I probably. I think we did some lemonade stands, but I loved the thing that I loved. My mom doesn't know it, but I loved when she would do garage sales. Oh yeah, because it was like having a little business there for a day or two. That was probably it for me.

Speaker 2:

That's sort of how I got my start. My mom she was a single mom and we went to garage sales and I loved that, like it really got me started. I'm 62 now I still go. I can't pass up a good deal. I've got full storage units of stuff I meant to sell but never did.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you're like I might need that one day, so yeah, yeah, that part of my life kind of came and went Well. Fulfillment is a word we don't hear very often in the business world, particularly On today's world in general, yeah, and in general, because we're. We are just assuming that if you have enough money then you're fulfilled, and I and I think you would take exception to that.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I mean, granted, I've never had a large amount of money in my bank account, but from watching other people that have had success and seeing these multi, multi-millionairesaires say it's not the money, it's seeing the change in people's lives, the impact you're able to have, and yeah, that's what really. I'm glad I've learned it at this stage in life because it's going to help propel me forward quicker and I have a lot more time to be able to do it.

Speaker 2:

I think a lot of people find that in about their fifth effort. Yeah, you know, in their 40s maybe they find out hey, I don't want to just make money, I want to make an impact, and in the Cash and Kenneth world we call that leave a footprint instead of a butt print. Yeah, and so well, good for you on that. So tell us a little bit about Patriot Dream Project. Patriotdreamprojectcom. Yep. If people want to find you, tell us a little bit about that business.

Speaker 4:

So the Patriot Dream Project is the website. The actual business name is American Dream Project. Okay, the reason, the question I get a lot is why the project at the end of it? And that's because I feel like the American dream. It's always a project, but if anything more, right now it is a project right now. Right Because the view of it has become so skewed and people have gotten just discombobulated over what it actually is Right. And I don't know if it's because of the hard times right now in the communities and in the economy, but people are stuck in this cycle of just going through the motions day in, day out, letting life pass them by. So I started the American Dream Project based on faith, family fitness, finance, firearms and freedom, which are they all embody freedom. Freedom, which are they all embody freedom.

Speaker 2:

And I feel like those are the elements that you need to establish the American dream in your life, right, so do you call it the six Fs.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I called it F6. F6. Okay, because we're in tornado alley. So I was like, what's the biggest tornado we can have? Is that an?

Speaker 2:

F6? I mean, I guess it would be yeah, cool, six Fs. That sort of looks like my report card. I thought you did it to make fun of me. Wow, so let's go in. The American Dream Project is the name of your company, yep, and the Patriot Dream Project is where they can find you online and also we can find you on Facebook and Instagram and MySpace and any of these other.

Speaker 4:

I don't know about MySpace.

Speaker 2:

Oh, Kenneth and I are superstars on it, all six members of MySpace. Oh yeah, that's right. Well, very cool. So tell us how your business works and what it does, and how can somebody engage with you so that you both get something out of it.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so I originally started with just a podcast like this Um, I want. When I decided I wanted to help people, I was like the best way that I can do that is, even though I'm not old and have a lot of experience right now, I still have experiences that I can share with people, lessons that I can share with people. So that's how I started it. I've had my podcast for about roughly a year or so. Oh great, and I really use that to just kind of the things that I've gained books, different tools, whether it be exercise equipment, supplements, financial books, all of the devotionals. I've taken those and what I've started doing is our product at Patriot Dream Project is a box.

Speaker 4:

I wanted to do a subscription box. Then I looked back at some subscription boxes that I had and I took the negatives from it. It was like you don't always know what you're getting in a subscription box and then you forget to cancel it when you don't want it and so it keeps coming out of your bank account. So I didn't want to do that to people. Because I want to have this business be completely transparent. I want you to know what you're getting. That way, when you buy it, you know exactly what you're getting Right. Good idea and I didn't want it to be a burden either to people be like oh, I've got this coming out monthly and forget about it Like the gym membership that people aren't using.

Speaker 4:

But so, yeah, I'm figuring out the concept of how exactly I want to do it, because the first month, this is only our second month doing it. First month was just one box with six items embodying each of those six elements. Right, this month, because I took some feedback from it, I did six boxes with a couple items for each of those elements. Oh, neat, okay.

Speaker 2:

So it's an actual physical box, yeah, that people can order, but they're not ordering it every month.

Speaker 4:

No, you have the choice. It'll be different items every month, okay, and you have the option whether you like it or you don't and you can either buy it or not Got it.

Speaker 2:

Okay. So now I know you're a big fan of Andrew Frisella Yep and we'd like to get him on the podcast, if we can. I don't know if you know him, but we'd love to have him. I wish I did. You know we would waive the fee for him to come on. That would be nice, but you're in the middle of doing his program called 75 Hard. I am, and I know we're going to talk a little more about fitness later. But what has your experience been with 75 Hard and Andy and his certain type of coaching that everybody well, I wouldn't say everybody, but most people really are enamored by? I think he's a great coach.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so to give you a little bit of background. First, I came from a background of I played sports all my life, um, trained hard. I was actually planning on going to play college basketball and just didn't end up doing it because it because of the whole pharmacy thing. It wasn't going to be worth my time. At that point I get to college and see, throughout high school I always struggled to put on muscle and so my last year of high school I learned dirty bulking and so I was able to, which is just eating basically whatever you want, as much as you want.

Speaker 2:

I think we did some dirty bulking this morning at breakfast. Okay, seems like it. We have a new phrase. I'm sorry.

Speaker 4:

No, you're good. But I learned that, like my junior senior year of high school and I did I finally put on muscle, but the bad thing is I stopped exercising as much and almost in general once I got to college. And so I put on it was probably close to about 100 pounds of not all muscle, right. And so once I finally got through all my college experiences and stuff and got here, I was like I can't do this. I can't have fitness be one of my six elements and not be fit Right. So I stumbled across Andy Fursella and the 75 Hard Program, because he says it all the time it's not a fitness program, it's a mental toughness program. Right, and it's a fitness program. It's a mental toughness program and it's a discipline program, and that is one thing that you have to have. If you're going to lose weight, put on muscle, anything, if you're going to grow your finances, grow a business, you have to have discipline.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely Well. Tell our listeners that don't know what 75 hard is. Tell them about the program real quick that you're doing.

Speaker 4:

So 75 hard is just the first element of basically a life program. Uh, the first 75 days you do two workouts a day, 45 minutes. Each one has to be outside, no matter what the weather is right and which oklahoma you don't know what it's going to be every day, but so you got that. You follow a diet. Um, you do no alcohol or anything. Drink no alcohol, which isn't a problem for me because, luckily, I've never drank in my life. Okay, that's easy.

Speaker 4:

You got that. You got to read 10 pages of a nonfiction book which is just going to help you grow mentally in whatever area that you want, and so you take those and you do those for 75 days straight. You mess up just the slightest. You have to start over, start over, yeah. And I've started over a good amount of times.

Speaker 2:

Wow okay, yeah, so which for you, has been the hardest element of 75 hard.

Speaker 4:

It's probably been the diet, honestly, because where my mind transitioned from that dirty bulk to that, I'll be honest, I became addicted to food. Basically, right, well food is good.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's good.

Speaker 4:

Well, and it releases that dopamine when you are having a bad day or having a good day, and so, yeah, I'd say the diet's probably been the hardest part for me. Okay. But yeah, that's just the first part of what they call the live hard program, and then you've got the three phases after that, which I am not to yet, but they're also. They add on things to the 75 hard. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

They lost me at cold shower.

Speaker 4:

It's actually not that bad.

Speaker 2:

I know I've had a lot of people say that to me and I'm like, well, you know, I've made it this far without doing it. I may ride the storm out with it. So how far along are you on this session?

Speaker 4:

So this session I am about, let's see, today is day 23 for me.

Speaker 2:

Are you feeling good about?

Speaker 4:

it. Oh yeah, I mean. The thing that I hate is that I've messed up so many times, right, because I'll get far and be like, oh, I feel great, and then I mess up, I have to start over.

Speaker 2:

Right, and the cool thing about it, it's your own ethic that causes you to start over.

Speaker 4:

Yep, and it's just being honest with yourself. Yeah, because I think that's the hardest thing for a lot of people in today's world is being honest with yourself. Oh yeah, and so that really it's really helped you develop that.

Speaker 2:

So talk about the mission, then the mission and value statement of American Dream Project and you know what? Tell us how you came up with it as well.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so I came up with it because so you've got faith. Grew up in a Christian home. Throughout my whole life, faith has been a huge part, and it's kind of a disadvantage, I want to say growing up in a Christian home, because you almost become numb to it a little bit. You go through these cycles of ups and downs and I feel like, for me personally, that was something that I had to rekindle and really get that fire going again. Rekindle and really get that fire going again. And I feel like that's something that's lost in today's world because, whether it's social media, news, whatever, it's just so degrading. People think everything is so bad in the world and if we don't have faith in God and whatever, you're going to have a hard time getting through life. So we've got faith. Whatever, you're going to have a hard time getting through life, so we've got faith. Families have been split apart through so many things between social media, between just TV and everything.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, a lot of distractions for the family.

Speaker 4:

Yep. So family was a big part, because you've got dads not in homes, you've got moms not in homes. Parents that are there, but they got moms not in homes, parents that are there but they're not present in their kids' lives Right, because they're looking at social media too, yeah, or they're just not there, they're playing games on their phones or whatever. And so I wanted to really bring back the family, because the whole reason for those six elements won't go too deep into all the other ones, but it's because I feel like this country has gone downhill for a while, and if we're going to get it back to its former glory and then make it better, it's going to start with what Andy Frisella calls personal excellence, and so, through personal excellence is how we're going to make the country the best it's ever been.

Speaker 2:

Okay, well, I like that. In fact, I'm one of those guys. I feel like entrepreneurship, this self-idea that we can all fend for ourselves in one way or the other, by delivering in a way that's beneficial to everybody. I think entrepreneurship is the single greatest key, and I'm not one that's going to say make the country great again. I think it's great, I think it's unbelievable, and there's so much chatter going on about this or that. I think the country's great. If you travel the world and go to places like India or Haiti, where there are different struggles than you and I face, you know here. I think what's great about you and all of us and our business is that if we choose to start over tomorrow, we just start over, like we don't have to get permission, we don't have to run it through the government, although the government might be a little overzealous, but that's I don't know. I think the United States is great, oh yeah, and there's a reason everybody wants to be here.

Speaker 4:

Oh yeah, I don't want to come off like I'm dogging on the US because it's still by far the greatest country in the world. Yeah, I wouldn't trade where I'm at in the world for anything, so it's just, I have a desire to want to see people be the best they can be, and that'll, in turn, make our country the best it can be.

Speaker 2:

Okay, well, we're going to take a quick studio break and we're going to talk to one of our sponsors here that keeps this show alive. Mr Kenneth, who do we have today?

Speaker 3:

This episode is sponsored by Kenneth Bauckham photography. Hi, my name is Kenneth Bauckham and I'm here to help you bring your awesome ideas to life. I specialize in helping businesses explode their online presence through professional photography, video and virtual event production with a rapid turnaround. It's commercial photo and video services with a personal touch. Learn more at KennethBaukhamcom.

Speaker 2:

I think the best ad for Kenneth Bockham Photography is this podcast that's going out to lots of people around the world and on the YouTube and you know we had 18,000 downloads last month.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

I think what you're doing is out there dude.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, it's been a lot of fun helping put it together and making it all work.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and it's working. I mean, we're here, no.

Speaker 4:

I want to give you guys mad props. The amount of episodes you guys have put out and then the amount of downloads you've gotten is just awesome.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I mean it's been, thank you. It was just an idea. We're on a cruise ship together like hey, what would this look like? I? Don't know, let's try it. And we went to what? Number 61 in the world, rated by Apple.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah, number 61 in entrepreneurship, yeah, yeah, that's awesome.

Speaker 2:

I don't know if that's good or bad, but it's better than number 62.

Speaker 3:

Well, that's true For sure.

Speaker 2:

All right, we're here today with Joshua Saberwall. Yeah, there you go. It's going to take me a bit, but we'll be best friends in a little while. And Joshua is the founder of the American Dream Project. You can find them online at patriotdreamprojectcom. You can find Josh on Facebook, instagram, myspace and I don't know where, and AOL Instant Messenger. And AOL Instant Messenger in the monster truck chat room.

Speaker 3:

That's right, that's right.

Speaker 4:

The real question is though do you still call it X, or do you call it X or do you still call it Twitter? I forgot that it even existed.

Speaker 2:

Do you tweet?

Speaker 3:

I do not tweet often.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I'm a low tweeter.

Speaker 3:

I'm trying to figure out, like do we still call it tweeting even though the platform is now called X?

Speaker 4:

What else would you call it? Do you call it X-ing?

Speaker 3:

And I guess what I'm confused about is I never did well with algebra. So is X just a variable Like what are we? Is it a multiplier?

Speaker 4:

I don't understand. Yeah, I don't get it. That was one rebrand that I was kind of like that's kind of something you don't touch, yeah.

Speaker 2:

I don't know, I never did the Twitter thing. I guess I missed out on all that For all my Twitter fan out there fan probably my wife. So we're talking with Joshua today about the mission of his business and we're getting some clarity on what it is he wants to accomplish. Anything else to add about your mission statement?

Speaker 4:

Really. I mean, the firearms is a fun part for me, just because I love guns, love building them, working on them. My great-grandpa was actually a gunsmith. Oh, so that's in your mind.

Speaker 4:

So that's kind of where that came in from, because originally I just wanted to kind of start a gun shop or kind of learn the gunsmithing techniques and all that. But I saw a greater need of wanting to help people, and so this is how I can kind of incorporate that little passion project of mine into this. So you don't have a gun shop, though? No, not yet Great idea.

Speaker 2:

I would love to have a gun shop. And when you get rid of an employee, guess what you say You're fired. No, nothing, sorry.

Speaker 2:

No, you're good, we had to bring out some dad jokes today. So you're just getting started. Oh yeah, this is always a fun time. I remember when my business started and I had some you know, elder people like 31 years old say stuff like thank you, like where do you see your business in five years or 10 years? And as a young man I didn't have a vision for that. I was like I don't know, I've never thought about 10 years from now. So let's turn the tables. Where do you see your business in 10 years?

Speaker 4:

Josh yeah, so I was just like you originally. Where do you see your business in 10 years, josh? Yeah, so I was just like you originally. I was just so focused on now and not 10 years down the road or anything. But the coolest thing that Andy Fussell probably talks about and it kind of goes unnoticed is visualization having the ability to visualize things. And usually when you are able to visualize things over and over again, they actually happen. And so I went a little ambitious with my goals, with my vision for 10 years.

Speaker 4:

Okay, and basically what I want this to turn into is you've got to kind of track with me here. So you've got a storefront that has a farmer's market with fresh food, fresh goods from local farmers in the area. Past that, you've got an area with brands, like Andy Frisell's First Form. You've got brands like Fuel Hunt. These American-made entrepreneurs, american-made brands. Bring those together and have a general store basically where you can come in. Bring those together and have like a general store basically where you can come in, and it's basically the Patriots dream of Target and Walmart. Have that with a gun shop, with a gym, that sort of thing, and eventually a gun range in the back.

Speaker 2:

So that becomes a lifestyle type company rather than just a retailer.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I want it where people can come in and just hang out not knowing each other. You get to hang out, work out together. You get to shop together.

Speaker 2:

You get to go to the gun range, go to the gun shop together Are you going to have a coffee shop in there, somewhere where we can all hang out? Kenneth and I have a problem, it's true. We need a buy-in for a coffee shop. That's right, that's right. We need a buy-in for Coffee Shop, that's right, that's right.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, and a podcast room.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, oh yeah, definitely that could actually be a thing.

Speaker 4:

No, I would definitely do it because of my own podcast.

Speaker 2:

I would put it you know, there's a store that opened up Okie Family Market over in Broken Arrow. I've seen that and they are friends of ours and we did a grand opening with them. With them, and they are not far. You need to go meet Eric and Stephanie over there who've created this thing, and it's doing very, very well. So it's good for you because we can see that rise up and know there's real demand there. Yeah, no, I think good for you, that's smart.

Speaker 4:

I think the American people are hungry to get back to their true patriot roots, and they're hungry to go back to traditional roots, so that's what I want this business to embody. Yeah, it may not happen for five, 10, even 20 years, but this is what I've settled on. This is my life's purpose, this is my life's mission, so I'm going to do whatever I can to make it happen.

Speaker 2:

That's beautiful. You know you actually bring up a great point, josh. In around the 1900s, the early 1900s, nobody really had jobs. You know they were farming and ranching and metalsmiths and, you know, did whatever. But about 90% of the people were what we would call self-employed and 10% had jobs. I can only imagine that way back in the day, like if you had a job, how people may have viewed you like what's wrong with you, dude, but you know, I think once you've been self-employed and can fend for yourself, there's almost no way you could ever go back.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I'm not to that point yet. Unfortunately, I'm still doing the. I guess you'd call it intrapreneur, so I'm still working a normal job while doing this stuff. Well, that's all right.

Speaker 2:

You have to view when you're working a normal job, working on your dream. You have to view that job as your angel investor. Oh yeah, that's my investor right there and they're going to pay me X. I got to do a good job for them. Yep, Because even if you had an investor, you have to do a good job for them. Yeah, and it's going to take time, effort, money. So you know, you do that in the early days and there's no shame in that at all. In fact, it's really smart as a way to get started. But it's because you have something on your radar, you have a destination in mind.

Speaker 4:

Yep, You're future focused in the present Right. So Well good for you.

Speaker 2:

So if there is such a thing, is there a formula for success? You?

Speaker 4:

buy into. The way that I've started to look at it is figuring out what it takes to get the job done, figuring that out and then doing it for the amount of time required. But the thing is, what people don't understand is you don't know the amount of time required. It could be 5, 10, 15, 20 years, but you have to have the will to do those things for however much time it takes, and so that's kind of the successful formula for me.

Speaker 2:

Okay, well, so maybe then success is a form of reverse engineering. Yeah, you know, we live in a world where I want to lose three pounds. Well, that's going to take me to walk you know 20 miles over a month and you just go okay. Well then, I just put in the steps. Is that what you're proposing? That we're sort of reverse engineering?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, what success looks like Take your goal and then you figure out okay, this is what I need to do to get the goal. And then you just break it down day by day, task by task, what you need to do, and just have the discipline and the will to do those tasks, even though you're not seeing instant results.

Speaker 2:

You got to have that delayed gratification at the end. Yeah, it's sort of like the first day you do 75 hard like I'm all in yeah.

Speaker 4:

You feel great. And then day 20, day 30, you're like, oh, it's still so far away.

Speaker 2:

I just want to like eat chicken fried cupcakes, yeah.

Speaker 4:

And I think your body likes to play tricks on you too, because you'll start, you'll see a little bit of weight come off and then you go into what I think they call a stalling period Right, where you go like one to two weeks where you don't lose any weight and you might even put a pound or two back on Right. So it's definitely a mental game.

Speaker 2:

Well, very cool. So you have a saying, and I want to read this back to you and make sure I have it right Success takes work, Work takes time and time is limited. Why did you make that your catchphrase? Because I mean, that's wonderful, it's complicated, but it's absolutely correct. Talk to us about your catchphrase.

Speaker 4:

It's kind of like your fire aim ready. Success is going to take work. You can't have success doing nothing, you have to take work. You can't have success doing nothing, you have to take action. But work is going to take time. You can't expect things to happen now, because in today's world, we live in the Amazon Prime Society, where you can order something in the morning, have it at your doorstep in the evening, right, that's not how success works. It takes time, but the thing is we have a limited time here on earth, so you have to have what. I mean I've said Andy for sell a lot, but he's had such a good influence on my life.

Speaker 2:

Well, sure, yeah, he calls it aggressive patience.

Speaker 4:

You have to be patient, but you have to be aggressive the whole time. You have to be working towards the patients.

Speaker 2:

I like that. Yeah, very cool. Um, so what do you use that catchphrase catchphrase in your advertising, or is that just a conversational?

Speaker 4:

piece. That's just something I say at the end of my podcast episodes.

Speaker 2:

Got it? Yeah, just a little reminder. So let's hear you say it, rather than me say it.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, success takes work, work takes time and time is limited. So we got to get out there and get to work.

Speaker 2:

Success does take work, man. There is no place you find success before work, except the dictionary. I think is the old meme. Yeah, I hope I caught that right. Sometimes I get my memes backwards and they don't go very well. So you're a man of faith. You grew up in a Christian household. You've carried that on through your life. For you, how do faith and entrepreneurship work together? How do you, how do you make that work for?

Speaker 4:

you. For me, entrepreneurship is faith. It's faith in the unseen, it's faith in yourself, faith in that you're going to be able to get stuff done. You're going to be able to achieve this stuff, um, because for a lot of people, seeing is believing. But with faith and entrepreneurship you are having faith in either what's been done in the past and what's happening now, or you have to believe in what's going to happen in the future.

Speaker 2:

Right, so are you a traditional goal setter? I'm going to write down five goals and a time frame and a method and go create. I would, so I've. One of the things I found, josh, is that, um, having a goal I want to make ten thousand dollars that's a good goal, yeah, um, but I, for me, those are outcomes. Yeah, they're not really goals. And and so I've all, as I matured, I had to really focus on what outcome would I like to have happen from this work, and I designed my workload around that objective. And so, if it was, I want to make $10,000 in a month or three, or when you're 20, $10,000 is like a year's worth. But you know, I was like, okay, well, if I need 10 grand, I'm going to need to talk to 50 people and out of those 50, some won't show and some won't become clients. But if I see 50 people? And then we turned those outcomes into what we called activity goals or activity objectives and, man, it made it a lot easier.

Speaker 2:

And then I came up with a phrase about getting paid on the nose and like, when you're in the sales world, if you sell cars or houses, and you got to know that if I need to sell 10 houses. Well, that might mean you need to make 200 phone calls, show 75 houses and we get all excited about the sale. Oh my gosh, I just made my 10 sales. But the reality is is you get paid for every phone call. Maybe you take your 10 grand and you divide it by 100 phone calls and realize, wow, I just made $100 a phone call instead of $3,000 per house. Yeah, and that's how, I don't know. You said your body plays tricks on on you, but so does your mind when you're in entrepreneurship. Oh yeah, and so we're always trying to figure out how to trick our mind.

Speaker 4:

That yeah, you have to have those little wins throughout the day, throughout your week, to trick your mind, to say I'm winning, even though I'm not seeing the actual result. I'm still winning by making these phone calls.

Speaker 2:

And winning's a destination. It's not an end point, it's just a portion along the way, yeah, but it's just a mark on the map, yeah. And it's really weird and I bet you're going to see this pretty soon. I had a goal when I was 20, and I look back on it and I'm like that was my goal. Yeah, what a terrible goal, but it was a goal. But it was a goal and it took me a while to hit it, took me some years to hit it. And then when I hit it, I was like, well, that's disappointing. Why did I ask for only that when I could have asked for what was genuinely the goal of my heart? And what do you think about goals then? Because some of these goals I see with people, they are really heartfelt, and then other people it seems like they're making up a number. I want to make $100,000.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I think a lot of people they'll make up that number just because that's what they feel like. The world tells them that the number needs to be, but what people actually end up doing is they actually end up setting themselves up I don't want to say for failure, but they underestimate their abilities and what can be done and they set their goals too small. Right, and so even if you set a huge goal like, say, make a million dollars in a year, okay, and you only end up making $250,000 to $500,000 of it, that's still a lot better than where you were at.

Speaker 2:

That's still amazing, yeah.

Speaker 4:

But if you'd only set your goal at $100,000, you probably would only made $25,000 to $50,000. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

I think so and I think we have to stretch a little bit. All right, let's go through the six Fs here and we'll get your business nugget here in a minute, but I want to repeat these because I think this is beautiful. We focus on fulfillment, not just the money side of life, but we focus in your program your idea of faith, family, fitness, finance, firearms and freedom. F6, like a big tornado. Does any one of those that you favor more than the other that you like to talk about more?

Speaker 4:

Oh man, it's tough because those are all things that I've had to really seriously address in my own life, yeah, where I'm at and where I need to be, but ultimately it boils down to faith. That's why it's the first one there, right? Because for me personally, I would not be where I am today at all without God. I just wouldn't be Throughout life, some things that have happened. If I had not redirected my course to my compass, which is God, I definitely would not be here, and so I would say faith is by far the most important. Got it?

Speaker 2:

I think a lot of us feel that same way that God is our compass. I think that's a beautiful saying. Well, we're going to wrap this up. We're here today with Joshua Saberwall, Did I?

Speaker 4:

get it right the fourth time. There you go, we're good, joshua Saberwall.

Speaker 2:

You can find him at the PatriotDreamProjectcom. You can find Joshua on Facebook and Instagram, and his objective is to help reclaim a better America, and that's a great direction to go. At the end of our show, we always like to get a business nugget from our friends, and so, joshua, let's talk about your golden business. Wait, do we want to name it? Do we have our?

Speaker 3:

we actually have a name for these. Let's see what would we call it. Do we have our? We actually have a name for these.

Speaker 1:

I mean, you know, we can name it, let's see what would we call it.

Speaker 3:

We might call it something like a Miss Bites. There we go.

Speaker 2:

Miss Bites. Okay. Well, we are wrapping up the show, so that was kind of nice. That was funnier to me, obviously, than it was to you.

Speaker 3:

All right, John Music back with it, I think, is what really helps sell it.

Speaker 2:

You think?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, next time Big grand entrance, that's right.

Speaker 2:

Okay, we'll get back to that, so tell us about your business nugget that our listeners could listen to and enjoy.

Speaker 4:

Yeah. So it's, of course, going to start with a quote from Andy Frisella, where he talks about personal excellence is the ultimate rebellion to anything, whether it be the lack of discipline, lack of physical fitness, mental fitness, it is the ultimate rebellion to it. And if our country is ever going to get back to its former glory and then just continue to get better, it's going to be through personal excellence. It's going to take each and every person, every entrepreneur, mom, dad, father, husband, wife, each individual becoming the best version of themselves. And if we can do that, then we have a very good chance at growing this country to be the best it has ever been. And so, yeah, that is it for that.

Speaker 2:

So be excellent. Yeah, so be excellent. Imitating. And you know, in my career, when you start to meet people of impact, you can't pick them up out of a lineup. They have beige lifestyles, you know they aren't flashing their bling around.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I think it's Alex Hormozy. He talked about how, after the queen died, it was the queen and people forgot about her just a few weeks after she had passed away. Oh yeah, so you think about somebody that has that big of an impact. They're easily forgotten.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I agree with that.

Speaker 4:

All right.

Speaker 2:

We're here with Joshua today and you can find him at thepatriotdreamprojectcom and we're talking about reclaiming the heart of our country. Personal excellence is the ultimate rebellion. Joshua got that from Andy Frisella, but we'll modify that and put some commas in it. It can be yours.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, we could figure it out All right.

Speaker 2:

Personal excellence is the ultimate rebellion, and we're here with Joshua. Cyberwall today PatriotDreamProjectcom Kenneth. This has been a great show. Cyberwall today PatriotDreamProjectcom. Kenneth. This has been a great show. I think this is the kind of stuff that this is going to be a good one to go listen to. Yeah, yeah, I've enjoyed it Very cool. Well, we're going to wrap this up today and we are really glad you're here with us. Yeah, I really appreciate you guys.

Speaker 2:

And look forward to making sure that our listeners out there in the country get to know you a little better there in the country, get to know you a little better. I'm excited to get to know them, get to know you guys better too. Well, I mean, this is such a fun thing to do because this is also, you know, a nice way for the world to get to know you and your business, and you know it's going to be on the youtube also. Have you heard of youtube?

Speaker 3:

yeah, I have. It's a nice place it's a cool place.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's going to be on there as well, so, all right, well, we're going to wrap it up. We're with Joshua Saberwal today. The PatriotDreamProjectcom website, the American Dream Project, is the name of his company Becoming Excellent. Plato said excellence is rare, and today we focus on moving towards excellence step-by-step, and we're thankful for the time. You know, as we wrap up our show today and I wrap up every show the same way today would be a great day to go out in this world and forgive somebody, because, after all, haven't you been forgiven thousands of times? And forgiveness is not about that other person, friend. It's about you letting go, learning the lesson and moving forward with whatever is next in your life. That's great. If you've got an anchor tied to your belt, it is hard to run quickly. Often, forgiveness is the key to taking the next right step in your life. My name is Cash Matthews and I believe we should fire aim ready. This is Cash Flows, and we're glad you're here.

Speaker 1:

That's our show for today. Stay tuned for another riveting edition of Cash Flows.

Introduction
Entrepreneurship and the American Dream
American Dream Project Mission and Values
Building a Lifestyle Company Mission
Faith, Entrepreneurship, and Personal Excellence
Moving Towards Excellence